Love and Fairy Dust

February 7, 2011

For the first several years after I got into metaphysics, it was such a heady feeling to hear myself being referred to as a “lightworker,” one who is here to bring love and light to the world, to teach, by example, the higher principles of the universe, and to help heal the planet.  I inwardly chuckled at the mental image I had of me gaily skipping all around the world, bringing this love and light to everyone.

I could see myself sprinkling it like one would sprinkle fairy dust, over those who needed it.  It took me several years to realize that not only do lightworkers have to stand in line at the checkout counter of supermarkets, argue over errors in their bills, wait for repairmen to show up to fix their broken appliances, and get stuck in rush hour traffic, but that anyone who treats people lovingly, with kindness and respect, is considered a lightworker.

This shouldn’t be confused with being saintly every minute of every day of our life, although that would be a refreshing change, but in most circumstances, we should take care that we don’t do anything to actively cause people to suffer.  We can’t prevent the sufferings of mankind but we can at least do our part not to contribute to it.

If ever we needed lightworkers, the time is now.  There is so much violence in the world that parents are afraid to let their children play in front of the house for fear of drive-by shootings and gang wars.  It’s an illusion to think that any of us are safe.  You used to be worried about being mugged when you were walking home in the dark.  Now you’re worried about being mugged in the light of day.

Where are the lightworkers when we need them?  Mother Teresa personified the ideal of a lightworker but she is gone.  Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi were our inspiration but they, too, are gone.  The world needs more of these special people to light the way for the rest of us.  And yet, from time to time, I still see people who are not famous light the way for us.

Every so often we will see a teacher or a nurse, a doctor or a musician, an artist or a construction worker light the way for us by living the principles of spirituality on a daily basis.  They don’t need religious leaders or do-gooders telling them how to be spiritual; they just are spiritual.

There was a story about a group of missionaries who wanted to bring the word of God to a primitive tribe.  They spent several weeks with these people indoctrinating them into the teachings of the masters.  When it was time for them to leave, they said goodbye to their new students and left in their boat.  A little while later they looked back in shock to see these unworldly people running across the water trying to catch up with them and yelling that they forgot something that the missionaries had taught them.  They didn’t need to be taught to be spiritual; they were the living embodiment of spirituality.

We make such a mystery of the term, “spiritual” and it really is so easy.  That is to say that the concept is easy, but living it can be an upward struggle, especially when your teenaged child tells you that he borrowed your new car and drove it into a fence, causing just enough damage to run up a large bill at the body shop but not enough damage for the insurance company to declare it “totaled.”

This entry was posted on at and is filed under Metaphysics/Spirituality. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Back to Top